Pitch Perfect 2 excelled in music but slightly lacked in plot

Pitch Perfect 2

Pitch Perfect 2
Genre: Comedy, Music

Director: Elizabeth Banks

Writers: Kay Cannon, Mickey Rapkin (characters)

Stars: Anna Kendrick, Rebel Wilson, Hailee Steinfeld


 

Synopsis: After a humiliating command performance at Lincoln Center, the Barden Bellas enter an international competition that no American group has ever won in order to regain their status and right to perform.
 

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When I saw that a Pitch Perfect sequel was being made, I got excited. The first film was enjoyable and formed a strong cohesive bond between comedy and a capella music. While it was nowhere near Oscar-worthy, overall it was entertaining which counts for a lot with many movie-goers. When it comes to Pitch Perfect 2, there are a lot of the same elements. Cinematically this is not a good thing as the first film was just another cookie-cutter film in that regard. But with a bigger sequel budget, Pitch Perfect 2 was able to capitalize on the elements that it knows best.

Pitch Perfect 2 bellas
The same Bellas are here with the same entertainment

When it comes to music like the first film, Pitch Perfect 2 soars. The music is more plentiful than the first film and the stage performances are definitely more extravagant. A capella music in general fascinates me with the ability to emulate instruments vocally and watching the various a capella groups perform is quite a spectacle. This time around, even the hit a capella group Pentatonix briefly makes an appearance validating the film for all the music-loving fans. When it comes to the musical performances throughout this film, not only will your eyes thank you but so will your ears.

 

Another aspect of this film that gets a boost is the comedy. While there are a few regurgitated comedic elements from the first film, there is one particular newcomer to the film that keeps the comedy flowing. Keegan-Michael Key (“Key & Peele”) seems like a comedic pro as Beca’s boss in the film. From his delivery all the way down to subtle facial expressions, Keegan-Michael Key is definitely a comedic highlight of this film. It’s unfortunate that he had such a small supporting role in the film because when it came to the comedy, he definitely outshined the rest of the cast.

 

bellas stage
The Bellas up the ante in this film with stage presence

Unfortunately for Pitch Perfect 2, it is a film and not a concert. As previously stated, many of the same elements from the first film are reused and recycled. When it comes to plot, it was essentially the same exact story from the first film with a slightly different mishap that offsets them and a slightly larger adversary. The characters don’t grow anymore than they already have in the first film making Pitch Perfect 2 seem more like a re-imagining of the first film rather than a sequel. At the same time I would like to reiterate that the point of the Pitch Perfect franchise is not to create cinematic gold, but instead to entertain…which it does.

 

Overall I found Pitch Perfect 2 to be very entertaining from a comedic and musical perspective. If you are a fan of the first film then you will enjoy this film probably as much as you did the first and be excited to see what the Bellas will sing next. For those who aren’t fans of the first film and the avid cinephiles out there, it would probably be best to steer clear. Pitch Perfect 2 is a film that is strongly built from the same mold as the original with a few additions to make it a bit more extravagant. On a personal note, I highly enjoyed a majority of the film and would recommend that everyone give it a shot.

Pitch Perfect 2 – 6.5 out of 10

 
Musically and “comedically” entertaining but “cinematically” lacking.

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About Ryan

First and foremost, Ryan Brown is a fan. He has been an avid fan of both the theater and cinema since an early age and his passion for both has been continually growing ever since. When dissecting a film, he focuses on all elements of film-making including some fan/cult factors. He believes that character development is the foundation of a good film and usually starts his analysis of a film from there moving forward. His writing style may be influenced by his background of narrative and argumentative studies in the subject, but he tends to enjoy a more conversational style to better interact with the readers, unlike some other pretentious and pompous writers.

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