Maximum Truth Review: A Raucous Ride with Hilarious Highs and Uneven Lows

In Maximum Truth, director David Stassen takes us on a wild ride with political grifter Rick Klingman and his sketchy buddy Simon as they embark on a mission to take down a rival congressional candidate. This mockumentary-style film offers moments of impressive humor, often resembling a more raunchy and out-there version of the beloved sitcom Parks and Recreation, but it does stumble at times. While the lead performance by Ike Barinholtz is solid, it’s Dylan O’Brien who steals the show, delivering most of the comedy with infectious enthusiasm. It’s clear that Barinholtz and O’Brien had an absolute blast filming this movie, which adds to the overall enjoyment of the experience.

The film’s comedy hits the mark more often than not, delivering laugh-out-loud moments and sharp satirical commentary on the world of politics. Stassen’s direction brings out the best in the comedic timing, and the clever script keeps the audience engaged throughout. There are several memorable scenes that will have you chuckling long after the credits roll. The humor is often irreverent and boundary-pushing, not shying away from controversial topics or edgy jokes. If you have a taste for politically-themed comedy that isn’t afraid to push the envelope, Maximum Truth has plenty to offer.

However, not all of the comedy in Maximum Truth lands with the same impact. Some jokes fall flat, and the film occasionally relies on clich├ęd gags that feel forced and predictable. While the hits outweigh the misses, the moments that don’t quite hit their mark can be a slight letdown, especially considering the film’s overall potential. Despite these occasional missteps, the film manages to maintain an energetic pace and keeps the audience engaged, even during the less successful comedic moments.

Ike Barinholtz delivers a strong lead performance as Rick Klingman, capturing the essence of a charismatic but morally dubious political grifter. Barinholtz’s natural comedic timing shines through, and he effortlessly carries the film’s more dramatic moments. However, it is Dylan O’Brien who truly steals the show as Simon, Rick’s sidekick. O’Brien’s comedic range and impeccable delivery elevate the film’s humor to new heights. His chemistry with Barinholtz is palpable, and it’s evident that the two actors had a blast bouncing off each other on set. O’Brien’s infectious energy and charm make him a standout, leaving audiences wanting more of his comedic brilliance.

One of the film’s downsides is its brevity. Clocking in at less than an hour and a half, Maximum Truth occasionally feels rushed, leaving certain plot points and character development lacking depth. While the brisk pace keeps the story moving forward, it also prevents the film from fully exploring its potential. A longer runtime could have allowed for greater character arcs and a more nuanced exploration of the political landscape being satirized. As it stands, the movie sometimes feels like a sprint to the finish line, sacrificing depth for quick laughs.

Maximum Truth falls short of being one of the best comedies in recent years, but it still manages to entertain and provoke laughter. If you’re in the mood for a politically-charged comedy that doesn’t take itself too seriously, this film will certainly tickle your funny bone. While not every joke lands and the runtime is on the shorter side, the film’s strengths lie in its sharp satire, impressive comedic performances, and the infectious chemistry between Barinholtz and O’Brien. Maximum Truth may not reach the pinnacle of comedy excellence, but it’s a worthwhile choice for some light-hearted entertainment when you have a free evening to spare.

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  • Acting - 7/10
    7/10
  • Cinematography/Visual Effects - 6/10
    6/10
  • Plot/Screenplay - 7/10
    7/10
  • Setting/Theme - 6.5/10
    6.5/10
  • Watchability - 7/10
    7/10
  • Rewatchability - 7/10
    7/10
Overall
6.8/10
6.8/10
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About Caillou Pettis

Caillou Pettis is a professional film critic and journalist as well as the author of While You Sleep, The Inspiring World of Horror: The Movies That Influenced Generations, and co-author of Out of Time: True Paranormal Encounters. He has been writing in the entertainment industry for over seven and a half years professionally. Throughout the years, he has written articles for publications including Gold Derby, Exclaim!, CBR, Awards Radar, Awards Watch, Flickering Myth, BRWC, Starburst Magazine, Punch Drunk Critics, Mediaversity Reviews, Vinyl Chapters, Northern Transmissions, and Beats Per Minute.