Nicolas Cage in talks to star in ‘Left Behind’ series reboot


 

For those who haven’t seen or heard of it, the “Left Behind” films were geared towards a Christian audience with a plot centered around the rapture. They starred Kirk Cameron who is best known for the TV series “Growing Pains” and for telling everyone they’re going to hell. Now that the films may be getting a reboot, it looks like Nicolas Cage may be the leading man in the films according to Variety.

 

Nicolas Cage is in negotiations to topline “Left Behind,” a mainstream reboot of the Christian-themed movie trilogy that will mark the first film from Stoney Lake Entertainment, a new production company led by Paul Lalonde of faith-oriented banner Cloud Ten Pictures.

Via: Variety

 

So first Nicolas Cage plays “Ghost Rider,” a man who makes a deal with the devil and is possessed by a demon spirit, then he’s going on to be the lead in one of the most well known Christian based films made. I only know of the “Left Behind” series, I personally haven’t seen it, but it’s quite a change from Cage’s typical type of roles…but then again he’ll do anything now. I’m interested to see what Kirk Cameron thinks of Cage’s involvement, given that “Left Behind” is the only film he had approved of being apart of after becoming so religious. I know the series has a specific Christian audience, so it will also be interesting to see how it affects that audience having Cage tied to the film and if it will strengthen or hurt the numbers at the box office.

About Ryan

First and foremost, Ryan Brown is a fan. He has been an avid fan of both the theater and cinema since an early age and his passion for both has been continually growing ever since. When dissecting a film, he focuses on all elements of film-making including some fan/cult factors. He believes that character development is the foundation of a good film and usually starts his analysis of a film from there moving forward. His writing style may be influenced by his background of narrative and argumentative studies in the subject, but he tends to enjoy a more conversational style to better interact with the readers, unlike some other pretentious and pompous writers.